Into Your Hands I Surrender - Michael John Trotta 50-3979

This elegant acappella setting, excerpted from the major work Seven Last Wordsis a stunning stand alone movement appropriate for the concert hall or within a liturgical service. It can be performed in English or in Latin.

Set in a gentle triple meter, the work unfolds as to explore surrender in the midst of great adversity. Cast in an ABA form, the work is accessible for a wide variety of choral ensembles and is fast becoming a favorite among conductors, choirs, and audiences.

Seven Last Words, is a seven-movement choral journey through the Passion, which delivers a powerful and captivating story encompassing a breathtaking palette of emotion, from intimate tenderness to majestic triumph. The work is a rare gem, powerfully emotive and effective in both liturgical and concert settings.

The piece may be done with full orchestra (flute, oboe, two trumpets in C, horn in F, timpani, harp, and strings), or with a chamber orchestra of flute, oboe, horn in F and piano. The work may be performed in either English or in Latin.

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Into your hands
I surrender my whole soul.
Not my will, but Your will be done.

Pater in manus
tuas commendo spiritum meum.
Fiat voluntas tuas.

Haunting and evocative, the work displays a superb sense of form and architecture, poignantly distilling the most intimate and universal moments of human emotion. From the tender mercy of “Father, Forgive Them” (1) to the hopefulness of the promise of “Today You Will Be With Me” (2), the work unfolds to reveal a complex tapestry of states of emotion. It builds from the compassion of “Behold, Your Son” (3) and the yearning of “I Thirst” (4), to the despair of “My God Why Have You Abandoned Me?” (5), the acceptance of “Into Your Hands I Surrender” (6), and finally the resignation of “It is Finished” (7). This setting uses various interpolations of bibli- cal and liturgical texts (e.g. Kyrie, “Truly This Man Was the Son of God,” “All of the Gates Were Opened Wide”) as com- mentary on, and in dialogue with, the words of Christ, further expanding the story and the reaction of those witness to the Passion.